Boulevard Pools

From Dr. Harry C. Silcox and Jack McCarthy For the Northeast Times:

One of the main attractions in Northeast Philadelphia between 1929 and the 1960s was the Boulevard Pools. This paradise for swimmers was begun with the idea of producing entertainment on a “grand scale” in the Northeast. Everything would be bigger and better, with entertainment that would rival anything elsewhere. It all began in 1926 when famed pool architect William F.B. Koelte began planning a pool for the Northeast.
While it would be located in Mayfair, the pool’s target clientele would be from the more populated neighborhoods to the south.

I remember seeing the pools as a kid but never had a clue about the history.  It is well worth the two minutes it will take you to read it.  This is the link.

  • Margie

    I enjoyed the article about the Boulevard pools. I swam and danced at boulevard back in the 60’s and 70’s. What a great time it was to grow up in. We walked everywhere.thanks

  • Ed D

    I lived on Disston St by Brous St. 1950 – 1974 So the pools were just around the corner and easy to get to. In the summer you could hear the people and the life guard whistles from our house. The Boulevard pools are part of the fond memories I have of growing up in NE Philly. Don’t forget that they had a large ice skating rink. Never went to he dances because I could not dance well and was and I am still self conscience about it. If they had kept the pools open the old neighborhood would have been better off for it.

  • Doowop joe

    I lived on the 3100 block of Princeton Ave. Played baseball for Mayfair Boys Club and the Holy Terrors. Went to the pool and dances for years. Best memories a kid could have growing up. Moved to Atlanta years ago and coach baseball for 20 teams. Always have the Phillies as our team name. Thanks Philly and the BOulevard Pools for all the great memories

  • marsta2060@yahoo.com

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/a94de48cc5151a81a44812eedd41aeeadfb60917b4b993a07bb17302137e1020.jpg I lived at 2931 Tyson, from ’47-’62. We were the first family to move into our row home.