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Frankford Chronicles – Agent Lydia Darragh – Intelligence Operative

It is a privilege to present today, a new work of historic research by Joe Menkevich.  Lydia Darragh is a fascinating subject in Frankford history although she did not live here.  I won’t go into her history since Joe has done the research and you should read it from his narrative.  Whenever we have posted any reference to Lydia Darragh in the past, it has received a large number if hits from the search engines. This new work from Joe, adds to the Darragh story by providing links to other historical documents that support the story.

So picture the period in December of 1777 when Philadelphia was occupied by the British army and the Continental army was camped out at Whitemarsh. Joe’s account brings it all to life. Read it here.

 

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Tuesday Night at the Historical Society

Preserving & Promoting the History of NE Philadelphia since 1905
HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF FRANKFORD
The Center for Northeast Philadelphia History
 
Tuesday, 11 December 2012  7:30pm
Holiday Tea
N.E. HALL OF FAME
HONORING PAST and 2012 INDUCTEES
Celebrate and learn more about the 2012 Northeast Hall of Fame inductees, including some of this areas historic churches, dating from 1682 (United Monthly Meeting Frankford) through 1807 (Campbell AME).
This is our members’ traditional Holiday Tea, so please feel free to bring desserts or tea sandwiches to share.
 
Refreshments served.  Members free; Others $5.00
1507 Orthodox Street, Philadelphia, PA  19124 
www.frankfordhistoricalsociety.org
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Tuesday Night at the Historical Society of Frankford

Tuesday, 13 November 2012 – 7:30pm
HOLMESBURG PRISON: ACRES OF SKIN
Allen M Hornblum
Author:  “Confessions of a Second Story Man: Junior Kripplebauer and the K & A Gang”

Join the author of “Acres of Skin” as he shares the challenges of researching history and a story of national significance about human exploitation in the name of medical science at NE Philadelphia’s former, historic Holmesburg Prison. A subject of the experiments will offer an insider’s look at the prison.

Refreshments served. Members free; Others $5.00
*************************************************************
COMING UP IN DECEMBER:
Tuesday, 11 December 2012 – 7:30pm
Holiday Tea
N.E. HALL OF FAME
HONORING PAST and 2012 INDUCTEES
Learn about the 2012 NE Hall of Fame inductees, including Frank Shuman (Solar Power) and Leon Sullivan (OIC), and meet/greet former and current ones, including representatives from some of the area’s historic churches. This is our members’ traditional Holiday Tea, so bring desserts or tea sandwiches to share.
1507 Orthodox Street, Philadelphia, PA 19124
www.frankfordhistoricalsociety.org
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90th Anniversary of the Dedication of the Frankford War Memorial

The War Memorial at Wakeling and Large Streets honors those who served in World War I.   It was dedicated on November 11, 1922 during the same week as the opening of the new Frankford El.  November 11th was at that time called Armistice Day in honor of the ending of hostilities of WWI.  It was later renamed Veterans Day.

The memorial lists the names of the 2,382 men and women who were from Frankford and served in the military during the war.  There were 28 fatalities in the list.  We have spent quite a bit of time working on documenting the history of the memorial and how it came to be there.  So that there names might not be forgotten, we created an index of the names from the images of the brass panels.  You can see it here.  Maybe you will find someone you recognize.

Below is a video of some of the history of the memorial that we produced with the help of Debbie Klak and the Historical Society of Frankford.

[fg_youtube]http://youtu.be/BWkvU9P8DPQ[/fg_youtube]

 

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Frankford El Marks Its 90th Anniversary

With no fanfare at all, the Frankford El turned 90 on November 5th. November 5, 1922 was the first full day of service on the El.  It connected the River Wards and Northeast Philadelphia to the Market Street subway and center city.  Prior to the El, you would have had a long and noisy ride on a trolley.

The coming of the El was welcomed by some and hated by others.  Now it is hard to imagine the Northeast without it.  It forever changed the face of Frankford.  You might enjoy reading a contemporary account of the first day from the Inquirer at this link.